Being a good human always precedes being a good artist. My art is my life-long research as well as my means to explore the ways of being human. My art seeks to find a metaphysical meaning of goodness. I use my art to empower myself, to protect and help humans against ideological hegemony, and to explore pathways for retreat from the complex capitalist system. My art, therefore, is focused on its conceptual functions in relation to its environment. Designed with the ability to compute and behave autonomously, my interactive objects are embedded in sculptures, performances, and installations. My objects express contradictory visual and behavioral appearances and engage and challenge my audience’s expectation of functionality. The active and conscious resistance contained within my work metaphorically asserts my thinking about how art can inhabit its “ideal individuality.”
        My work usually creates an immediate and immersive experience for my audience that highlights the subtle and complex nature of the economic relationships between humans and objects. By creating bodies of autonomous, functionless, and valueless sculptural objects and devices, my art agitates and overwhelms its audience. This antagonistic stance confers a power to my objects, which not only manufactures distance between my art and its audience, but also eliminates the hierarchical positions of subject and object, placing them at equal standing. My methods to mismatch the input and output of the interactivity of my art - such as silent feedback, surveillance, and self-destruction - disrupts common notions of exchange, so that a capitalist concept of consumption and commodification can be filtered and removed. This alternative interaction shuts down the common communication between my audience and art objects. It creates a speculative state of autonomy, in which I may search for a moment of beauty inside a closed system and where objects are no longer constrained by any anthropocentric relations.